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Topic: Re: To K-12 teachers here: Another enjoyable post from Dan Meyer
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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,235
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: To K-12 teachers here: Another enjoyable post from Dan Meyer
Posted: Jan 22, 2013 7:21 AM
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CORRECTION to mine of Jan 22, 2013 10:59 AM (pasted below my signature for reference):

It has been pointed out to me that GW Bush had already proven himself to be extremely stupid long before he was elected president the first time around.

Point taken. My apologies for my error.

GSC

GSC's post of Jan 22, 2013 10:59 AM:
>
> Robert Hansen (RH) posted Jan 22, 2013 7:02 AM:

> >
> > No, I was pointing out that this problem has
> > redundancy in it and the odds of 18 clever students
> > fouling it up all at once are the same as the odds

> of
> > one clever student fouling up 18 such problems in a
> > row. Very small.
> >
> > Bob Hansen
> >

> It's not a perfect analogy, for sure - but we did
> have about 50 million US citizens (which must have
> included several million very, VERY clever citizens)
> voting twice around for GW Bush, who had already been
> proven, not long after he entered his first term, to
> be extremely stupid indeed. Later, he even proved
> himself to be a war criminal.
>
> This is just to point out that 'redundancies in
> societal systems' are extremely difficult (sometimes
> even impossible) to understand.
>
> GSC
> ("Still Shoveling!")

> >
> > On Jan 21, 2013, at 7:23 PM, Richard Strausz
> > <Richard.Strausz@farmington.k12.mi.us> wrote:
> >

> > > No - I assume you are joking.



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