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Topic: The Cross Referance on Bees
Replies: 4   Last Post: Jan 29, 2013 2:02 PM

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herbert glazier

Posts: 192
Registered: 7/26/10
Re: The Cross Referance on Bees
Posted: Jan 23, 2013 8:35 AM
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On Jan 22, 4:40 pm, Kevin <barry196...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> OK, let's talk about a lighter change of topic which is Uranium...
> Well, I guess it is commonly known at this point that electrons in the
> outer shells of the heavier elements traverse at relativistic
> velocities... What does that mean? Well, it means they don't spin and
> the energy of the electron's orbit is a function of that electron's
> radius... What is surprizing to me personally is that what I associate
> with Feynmann seems to indicate that he may have modeled much of his
> analysis on Uranium... Electrons in the outer shells of Uranium don't
> interact with each other such that the orbit of one electron
> influences the orbit of another electron in the same shell... That is
> acceptable up to a point but I don't think that the orbit of electrons
> is a repetative cycle analygous to the orbits of gravitational
> bodies... The cross referance with bees is that electrons in orbit in
> the outer shells of Uranium have a given resonance and that given
> resonance is present in electrons that are not in orbit about a given
> radius... Electrons that traverse through a conductor such as a copper
> wire have a similiar resonance.


Bees are dying like flies. They are showing humankind that our air is
getting toxic. Einsten told us we need the bee . TreBert



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