Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math.independent

Topic: testing out the Malus law replacement in Ohm's law of the Faraday law
Chapt15.34 explaining Superconductivity from Maxwell Equations #1174 New
Physics #1294 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Replies: 2   Last Post: Jan 23, 2013 10:00 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
plutonium.archimedes@gmail.com

Posts: 9,255
Registered: 3/31/08
testing out the Malus law replacement in Ohm's law of the Faraday law
Chapt15.34 explaining Superconductivity from Maxwell Equations #1174 New
Physics #1294 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Posted: Jan 23, 2013 1:05 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

Testing out the Malus law replacement in Ohm's law of the Faraday law.

Now then, in my prior post I showed where Faraday's law is Ohm's law:
In Faraday's law as stated by:
emf  = -N dB/dt
where 1/N is Resistance, and dB/dt is Voltage and
emf is current i, and where we delete the negative sign.

So Faraday's law becomes:

i = V/R

Now for superconductivity, the R becomes another function of the Malus
law I' = I" cos^2 A.

So we replace R in i = V/R with the Malus law

i = V/(I"cos^2A)

Now let us check out in an experiment whether that is what happens in
physics.

On page 740 of Halliday & Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, 3rd
edition, 1988, shows experiment one
of what is likely a remake of what Faraday did in the 1830s of his
famous Faraday law. On page 740 shows a closed loop wire connected to
a Galvanometer, G, and a hand holding a bar magnet aimed at moving
into the center of the closed loop of wire and by the motion, the G
should register a small electric current.

Now, to test out whether the Malus law is applicable, we re-do that
experiment and hold the bar magnet so that it does not move into the
center at a perpendicular to the wire loop cross section area. We move
the bar magnet at a oblique angle, just as in Malus law, we have a
oblique polarized filter.

So, the question is, how does the current in G register with the bar
magnet motion at oblique angles?

--

Google's archives are top-heavy in hate-spew from search-engine-
bombing. Only Drexel's Math Forum has done a excellent, simple and
fair archiving of AP posts for the past 15 years as seen here:
http://mathforum.org/kb/profile.jspa?userID=499986

Archimedes Plutonium
http://www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom
where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies



Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.