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Topic: What is the modern way of proving E=MC^2 using SR?
Replies: 3   Last Post: Feb 6, 2013 4:50 PM

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Brian Q. Hutchings

Posts: 5,600
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: What is the modern way of proving E=MC^2 using SR?
Posted: Feb 6, 2013 4:50 PM
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it is a very simple emendation of Liebniz et al's
*vis viva*, mvv/2 = kinetic energy,
wherein "E" has no potential energy, because
light is waves in hte medium of space,
index of refraction not equal to "one, God-am it."

also, eminently picturable by nonlightconeheads.

> > **  E = M c^2

thus:
> watervapor does have, and it IS main GH gas.
> But it mostly have absorption bends in areas
> far from IR emission maximum.


thus:
if Tierra del Feguans are not out getting their first tan
of the season, all dressed-up in furs, why aren't they?

this is the second-most awful malaproposisme,
after "global" warming; "hole(s)" in the ozonosphere,
plainly be folks who are not cognizant
of the anticyclonic winter/night thingy.
> about uv induced tumors

thus:
according to my (Westinguouse Research) source,
dihydrogen oxide has a much larger window
of absoprtive spectrum, then you-know-what.

thus:
restraining order on the googoplex ;
I suggest that you try it, yourself, every candy-colored moon or so.

thus:
"global" warming is a horrible malaproposime,
totally confounded by the most elementray datum. and,
the datum of concern hereinatsville is significant
in its own wright, no matter what the God-am Peanut Gallery has
to type about it ... especially Snoopy.



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