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Topic: 2^57,885,161 -1
Replies: 10   Last Post: Feb 9, 2013 1:28 PM

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Pubkeybreaker

Posts: 1,389
Registered: 2/12/07
Re: 2^57,885,161 -1
Posted: Feb 7, 2013 3:56 PM
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On Feb 7, 2:00 pm, Transfer Principle <david.l.wal...@lausd.net>
wrote:
> On Feb 7, 7:17 am, Frederick Williams <freddywilli...@btinternet.com>
> wrote:
>

> > Sam Wormley wrote:
> > > Largest Prime Number Discovered [to date]
> > > >http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=largest-prime-number...
> > > > The number ? 2 raised to the 57,885,161 power minus 1 ? was
> > > > discovered by University of Central Missouri mathematician Curtis
> > > > Cooper as part of a giant network of volunteer computers devoted to
> > > > finding primes, similar to projects like SETI@Home, which downloads
> > > > and analyzes radio telescope data in the Search for Extraterrestrial
> > > > Intelligence (SETI). The network, called the Great Internet Mersenne
> > > > Prime Search (GIMPS) harnesses about 360,000 processors operating at
> > > > 150 trillion calculations per second. This is the third prime number
> > > > discovered by Cooper.

> > By Cooper or by GIMPS?
>
> By Cooper. GIMPS itself has discovered 14 primes.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Internet_Mersenne_Prime_Search


Cooper found the specific prime, BUT it was a GIMPS
*** group effort** that sifted through many many thousands of
candidates
and eliminated them as possibilities.



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