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Topic: Religious Dos and Don'ts wrt Academe
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Kevin

Posts: 496
Registered: 5/1/10
Religious Dos and Don'ts wrt Academe
Posted: Feb 6, 2013 7:51 PM
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Academe needs me because Academe is beyond incompetant when it comes
to dealing with awkward situations (like if a student attempts or
commits suicide)... Have you ever been flattered by your professor as
an undergraduate? It's disconcerting at some level... What is the real
reason for it? Well, it's not too objectionable if it is a means to
compensate for being obsessive. The alternative example is an
obsessive professor who does nothing to compensate... For that, the
solution is crime and punishment. The number one "don't" in Academe
is:

Don't pre-escalate your intolerance of religion... This is the crime,
so what is the punishment? It is comprehensible to me that physicists
who profess religious faith are considered to be having a nervous
breakdown but... I see nothing wrong with a man who has a PhD in
Physics who decides to join the Catholic priesthood...

The second "don't" is the expression that goes something like 'Asking
additional questions raises more questions than it answers.' What I
read into that is that anyone who would say that in front of a
classroom full of students only conveys what an idiot he is... The
punishment is that if you agree that God is the one who has all of the
answers, then that does basically tie in with my understanding of what
a common sense belief in God entails.



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