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Topic: probability question about the dice game
Replies: 11   Last Post: Feb 18, 2013 10:43 AM

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Paul

Posts: 401
Registered: 7/12/10
Re: probability question about the dice game
Posted: Feb 15, 2013 1:33 PM
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On Friday, February 15, 2013 6:21:15 PM UTC, duncan smith wrote:
> On 15/02/13 17:34, pepstein5@gmail.com wrote:
>

> > On Friday, February 15, 2013 3:22:52 PM UTC, David C. Ullrich wrote:
>
> > There are 505 equally likely cases leading to a win and 791
>
> >>
>
> >> equally likely cases leading to a loss. That makes the odds of
>
> >>
>
> >> winning precisely 505 to 795.
>
> >>
>
> >
>
> > David, this is the mistake of yours that I was referring to. Correct would be "That makes the odds of winning precisely 791 to 505". (795 instead of 791 is a typo here(.
>
> >
>
> > So this was a mistake of yours.
>
> >
>
>
>
> [snip]
>
>
>
> Those are the odds "against" Ann winning, not the odds of (or "on") Ann
>
> winning. They might be the odds quoted by a (fair) bookie, but he'd be
>
> quoting the odds against a win for Ann.
>
>
>
> Duncan


For God's sake!!!!

Surely, the meaning of words should take into account how those words are actually used!!!

I've lived in the States. I've lived in the UK. People say things like "The odds of winning the lottery are millions to one."

Other than two people on this thread, no one ever says "The odds of winning the lottery are one to millions."

Paul



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