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Topic: The most fundamental physics equation
Replies: 3   Last Post: Feb 18, 2013 8:36 AM

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Will Janoschka

Posts: 28
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: The most fundamental physics equation
Posted: Feb 17, 2013 6:12 AM
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On Sun, 17 Feb 2013 09:13:37, "Tom Potter" <tdp1001@yahoo.com> wrote:

> 1. The most fundamental physical property is angular displacement.
>
> 2. Quantum changes occur when systems exchange angular displacement.
>
> ( You can add or take away cycles from a pendulum
> or oscillating system. )
>
> 3. The most fundamental quanta of change is best modeled by "i'
> ( The square root of minus one. )
>
> 4. i^1 = a quarter cycle counter-clockwise angular displacement
> i^2 = a half cycle counter-clockwise angular displacement
> i^4 = one cycle counter-clockwise angular displacement
> i^n = n quarter cycles counter-clockwise angular displacement
> i^4n = n cycles counter-clockwise angular displacement
>
> 5. Changes occur in quanta of i^n
> http://www.microwaves101.com/Encyclopedia/quarterwave.cfm
>
> http://www.microwaves101.com/ENCYCLOPEDIA/smithchart.cfm
>
> 6. The quanta units of angular displacement include:
> a. cycles = i^n/4
> b. half cycles ( cycles * 2 )
> c. Quarter cycles ( cycles * 4)
>
> 7. The real number units of angular displacement include:
> a. radians = ( 2 * pi * cycles )
> ( Which is an angular displacement referenced to a space unit.)
> b. action = Planck's Constant * i^n/4
> ( Which is an angular displacement referenced to an energy unit.)
>
> 8. Angular displacements are measured using
> an external standard frequency source.
>
> Since 1967, the International System of Units (SI) has defined
> the second as the duration of 9192631770 cycles of radiation
> corresponding to the transition between two energy levels of the caesium-133
> atom.
>
> In other words, although i^n is the most fundamental quanta of change,
> in order to measure it,
> it must be referenced to an external source,
> and at the present time,
> that reference is an energy level transition of the caesium-133 atom.
>
> 9. The Potter Equation is the most fundamental physics equation.
> x = e^(i^n * m*pi) = e^((i^n)^2 * k)
>
> It expands the "Euler Identity" equation (e^(i*pi) + 1 = 0)
> http://www.songho.ca/math/euler/euler.html
>
> and relates pure math to physical reality.
>
> ( Note that "m" and the "k"
> interface quanta angular displacements to a linear space.
> 2*pi*r, pi*d, k = pi*n*r )
>
> The Potter Equation which features quanta of angular displacement
>
> is more fundamental than e = hf
> ( Which features Planck's quanta of action.)
>
> and is more fundamental than e = mc^2
> ( Which features Einstein's non existent quanta of energy.)
>
> 10. Change is conveyed from sources to sinks in quanta of i^n,
> ( Quarter wave quanta )
>
> Planck's Constant is a constant
> used to convert angular displacement quanta to action.
> ( i^n * h = action )
>
> And Einstein's quanta of energy is action quanta "h" affected by velocity.
> ( energy = hf and relative motion affects f.)
>
> 11. Several other constants come into play
> when equating measurements based on
> either cycles (Quanta) or radians (Real) to reality
>
> Cycles are bosons and many bosons can occupy a point.
>
> ( You can add or take away cycles from a pendulum
> or oscillating system. )
>
> The measured value of a batch of bosons
> depends upon how the measurement is made
> and expressed:
>
> peak
> peak to peak
> average
> rms,
> quasi-peak
> etc.
>
> Observe that peak and peak to peak
> quantize a batch of bosons at a point in time
> whereas quasi-peak, average and RMS
> quantize the batch over some time period.
>
> 11. Quanta of angular displacement tend to
> migrate from high temperature systems
> to contiguous lower temperature systems.
>
> For more information visit my physics web site.
> http://184.105.237.216/~tompotte/menu.html
>
> I think this post is bulletproof
> and like to see anyone shoot a hole in it.
>
> I welcome feedback, comments, criticism,
> and even sharpshooting.
>
> (A 'sharpshooter' criticizes without offering suggestions.)
>


Very good mathematics, but nothing to bring home the bacon.
Sorry just a engineering viepoint. -will-

Ps, I still think Erwin's stuff is more fundimental.
If you want to do the math, fourspace is inadequate.
Try thinking in octonions! (just a suggestion)



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