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Topic: NEUTRALISER OU AIGUISER LES CONTRADICTIONS DU PARADOXE DES JUMEAUX?
Replies: 8   Last Post: Mar 24, 2013 3:09 PM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,415
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: NEUTRALISER OU AIGUISER LES CONTRADICTIONS DU PARADOXE DES JUMEAUX?
Posted: Mar 23, 2013 5:51 PM
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http://www.canal-u.tv/video/cerimes/quels_temps_font_ils_une_introduction_au_temps_des_physiciens.7605
Quels temps font-ils ? Une introduction au temps des physiciens. Scénario : Marc LACHIEZE-REY, Etienne KLEIN et Hervé LIEVRE, 46:58 : "Les physiciens pensent qu'un temps universel existe, mais la relativité générale permet d'imaginer qu'il n'existe pas."

Etienne Klein,

C'est sûr que vous êtes l'auteur de cet énoncé, et il est vrai. Mais cette doublepensée, elle va dévaster la physique jusqu'à quand?

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20026831.500-what-makes-the-universe-tick.html
"It is still not clear who is right, says John Norton, a philosopher based at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Norton is hesitant to express it, but his instinct - and the consensus in physics - seems to be that space and time exist on their own. The trouble with this idea, though, is that it doesn't sit well with relativity, which describes space-time as a malleable fabric whose geometry can be changed by the gravity of stars, planets and matter."

http://www.homevalley.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=135:its-likely-that-times-are-changing&catid=41:quantec-articles&Itemid=68
"Einstein introduced a new notion of time, more radical than even he at first realized. In fact, the view of time that Einstein adopted was first articulated by his onetime math teacher in a famous lecture delivered one century ago. That lecture, by the German mathematician Hermann Minkowski, established a new arena for the presentation of physics, a new vision of the nature of reality redefining the mathematics of existence. The lecture was titled Space and Time, and it introduced to the world the marriage of the two, now known as spacetime. It was a good marriage, but lately physicists passion for spacetime has begun to diminish. And some are starting to whisper about possible grounds for divorce. (...) Physicists of the 21st century therefore face the task of finding the true reality obscured by the spacetime mirage."

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/ias/earlycareer/events/time/programme/julian_barbour.pdf
Aspects of Time, Julian Barbour, Warwick, August 24th 2011: "Was Spacetime Glorious Historical Accident? (...) ABSOLUTE SIMULTANEITY RESTORED!"

http://www.fqxi.org/community/articles/display/148
"Many physicists argue that time is an illusion. Lee Smolin begs to differ. (...) Smolin wishes to hold on to the reality of time. But to do so, he must overcome a major hurdle: General and special relativity seem to imply the opposite. In the classical Newtonian view, physics operated according to the ticking of an invisible universal clock. But Einstein threw out that master clock when, in his theory of special relativity, he argued that no two events are truly simultaneous unless they are causally related. If simultaneity - the notion of "now" - is relative, the universal clock must be a fiction, and time itself a proxy for the movement and change of objects in the universe. Time is literally written out of the equation. Although he has spent much of his career exploring the facets of a "timeless" universe, Smolin has become convinced that this is "deeply wrong," he says."

Pentcho Valev



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