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Topic: plutonium's Dishonesty.
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bacle

Posts: 838
From: nyc
Registered: 6/6/10
plutonium's Dishonesty.
Posted: Mar 5, 2013 10:57 AM
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In her post:


Re: Chapt16.13 Galactic shapes and evolution when Maxwell Equations are axioms over all of Physics #1271 New Physics #1391 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed
Posted: Mar 5, 2013 10:47 AM

plutonium wrote, in part:


> Here is an excellent question to ask your local
> physics or astronomy
> professor who accepts the Newton force of gravity or
> the General
> Relativity gravity. Ask him/her, how is it that the
> Solar System has a
> Plane of Ecliptic and that most galaxies-- 66% have
> similar plane of
> ecliptic as seen in spiral galaxies? Ask them because
> in both
> Newtonian gravity and General Relativity, planes
> should not be the
> endproduct, but rather, revolutions of objects around
> a central mass
> should be in all 360 degrees directions, not
> coalesced into one single
> plane.
>
> Now they would be very much stuck and blushing in
> shame, because their
> vaunted Newtonian gravity or General Relativity is
> deaf dumb and
> silent as to why the endproduct of gravity is a plane
> of ecliptic.

<snip>

Asshole: the minimum level of fairness and ethics would behoove you to ask the question yourself, and let others answer before you pass judgement. Instead, you ask the question, answer it yourself for them and then accuse them of being wrong.
This is called a straw man, and it is seen as cowardly and unethical, i.e., the type of conduct you usually engage in.



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