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Topic: Schrodinger's Wave
Replies: 4   Last Post: Apr 25, 2013 5:41 PM

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Kevin

Posts: 496
Registered: 5/1/10
Schrodinger's Wave
Posted: Apr 24, 2013 11:53 AM
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(So Schrodinger's Wave is an IQ test question to determine if you are,
in fact, a virtuoso and therefore Schrodinger is a major asshole?
Yeah, well, he is a major asshole because you're not a virtuoso and I
am and therefore, *WHY SHOULD I CARE?*)

So a wave is propagating away from the origin of a plane surface at
the speed of light and an observer is moving away from the plane
surface at the speed of light and therefore the wave appears to not
propagate from the observer's reference frame... but what if two pairs
of eyes are moving away from the observer's reference frame at less
than the speed of light and those two pairs of eyes are entangled? Ya
see, the issue with Schrodinger's Wave is that ya can't tell which way
a simple wave is propagating and therefore a simple wave can always be
transformed into something else. Two unequal simple waves which are
entangled give confidence with regards to the direction of
propagation. Schrodinger's Wave gets transformed into a sphere which
has uniform surface tension except for a line of tension that crosses
the equator. So a line of tension that crosses the equator creates a
ripple on the surface of the sphere which is stationary. The line of
tension on a sphere blends in with the uniform surface tension on the
remainder of the sphere which creates the ripple. The sphere with a
ripple caused by a line of tension is fine with me even though it is a
simple wave... if that is what Schrodinger's wave transforms into but
how come science presents Schrodinger's Wave without making mention of
the rippled sphere Schrodinger's Wave transforms into? (I should be
afraid to ask but is it because: 'Only in America'?) The ripple on the
sphere is a simple wave, right? Well, ya see, there is no relief for
Schrodinger's Wave given:

A translucent and/or transparent ribbon conveys a complex and
ergonomic translucent and/or transparent wave which is disentangled by
proving a sideways turn of a point into the

'f(x) = (+ or -)A*x^2*SIN(x)'

dimension... If the ripple on a sphere was 'the rigor' then there
might be room to compromise. The thing is that I've seen
'Schrodinger's Wave' in the stratosphere. You have to manipulate the
shells of a sphere to even get to Schrodinger's Wave and after all
that, Schrodinger's Wave is nowhere close to being directly over my
head. 'k, by way of analogy: Christo Redente is a monopole... Houston,
TX is a monopole... Swapping Christo Redente with Houston, TX, inverts
the Earth on the plane surface defined by the equator... Well, the
reason why that's possible is because there is a line of tension
between Houston, TX and Christo Redente but the fly in the ointment is
that Earth is only inverted on the American side of two oceans... What
connects North and South America to the rest of the world? America, in
reality, capitulated 'The Cold War' since Aerospace Engineering in
America doesn't have the leverage against the combined land mass of
the rest of the world. IMHO, you would get a much better atomic clock
if you used Uranium instead of the smaller atoms typically used for
that purpose.



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