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Topic: OPEN CHALLENGE TO MATHEMATIANS ON THIS PUBLISHED POLARITY AT 10*3 Numbers
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HOPEINCHRIST

Posts: 335
From: USA
Registered: 2/7/11
OPEN CHALLENGE TO MATHEMATIANS ON THIS PUBLISHED POLARITY AT 10*3 Numbers
Posted: May 5, 2013 2:49 PM
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Only if you can understand it, its published in a Recognized journal of the American Mathematical society .

International Journal of Applied Mathematical Research, 2 (2) (2013) 279-292
©Science Publishing Corporation
www.sciencepubco.com/index.php/IJAMR
The spiral code of prime numbers
Vinoo Cameron
Hope Research, Athens, Wisconsin, USA
E-mail: Hope9900@frontier.com
Abstract

The, following are the divergence codes for the half-line values of numbers at 1:3, (10*3, obviously the code can be written at 60 and multiples of value30). It is simple basic mathematics. The ?sui generis? for prime number variability at 1:3 divergences is based on the following half- line values at 10*3 constant for the spirals.19=16 half-line value, 23=-14. What is the half-line value of 15, given the obvious fact that 16+14=30 16(19)+14(23)=30 , WHAT IS THE HALF-LINE VALUE FOR THE NUUMBER 15 What is 15(??)!!-.
0=+30
2=+26
4=+22
6=+18
8=+14
10=+10
12=+6
14=+2
15=+0
16=-2)...
18=-6
20=-10
22=-14
24=-18
26=-22
28=-26
30=-30
32=-34
34=-38
36=-42
38=-46
40=-50
42=-54
44=58
46=62
48=66
50=70
52=74
100=-170

The value at half-line 100 is -170. All numbers have a half-line value

The readers will not be offered the final work on the spiral calculus, which is the so called ?mathematical writing on the wall?, a no brainer. This is briefly shown below.
The author first confirms the divergence/ convergence of 19 here at exact 1:3 and 1:6 as per well published manuscripts. Secondly the author presents a continuous prime number sieve at proportio



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