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Topic: Action-Reaction or Reaction-Action ?
Replies: 1   Last Post: May 28, 2013 7:46 AM

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jdawe

Posts: 309
Registered: 11/8/09
Action-Reaction or Reaction-Action ?
Posted: May 27, 2013 11:39 PM
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I say Action-Reaction with 'reaction' on the right and 'action' on the
left, however it really should be written the other way around:

Reaction - Action

(Reaction A = Actions XYZ)

Secondly, when I say to use the 'logic' of Action-Reaction there is
obviously an opposite of logic which is illogical, and it wouldn't be
Action-Reaction if it didn't recognise the 'illogical' with the
'logical'.

Reaction - Action

Logical - Illogical

(Logical Reaction A = Illogical Actions XYZ)

Therefore, to make sense of the illogical actions of the Universe
there is always a logical reaction.

Now, it is interesting to note though how the 'absolute' reaction is
dependent on the 'relative' actions.

Reaction - Action

Absolute - Relative

Dependent - Independent

(Dependent Absolute Reaction A = Independent Relative Actions XYZ)

Whilst it may be dependent on the relative actions, the reaction
actually occurs before the actions have a chance to complete.

Instantaneous - Gradual

Because actions are timed, the opposite reaction must be untimed
therefore instantaneous.

An instantaneous reaction therefore is able to be in place before the
gradual actions have the chance to act.

(Instantaneous Reaction A = Gradual Actions XYZ)




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