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Topic: The Sun Referance
Replies: 1   Last Post: May 29, 2013 3:05 PM

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Kevin

Posts: 496
Registered: 5/1/10
The Sun Referance
Posted: May 29, 2013 11:55 AM
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If my left eye is a lever that controls the motion of my head then I
get knot theory... Knot theory gives me the Sun referance and feedback
loops... Feedback loops can take a seemingly random cycle and proves
that there is a pattern to what was thought to be a seemingly random
cycle but that much is lost if it was ever important to begin with. So
what is significant? Well, my left eye is what maintains focus but
isn't that counterintuitive given right eye dominance? Well, my right
eye doesn't concern itself with inversions of a sphere or entanglement
between two inputs from the same source. If my eyesight gets
progressively more nearsighted over the course of time then it is
because my lazy right eye maintains a consistant lack of focus.
Conjecture or hypothesis: What is the cure for progressive near
sightedness? Right eye dominance is the cause of progressive near
sightedness. Entanglement leads to degaussification. If I wake up in
the morning and I open my eyes and my eyes are crossed then right eye
dominance doesn't clarify the issue by maintaining focus but rather by
maintaining a consistant lack of focus instead... Maybe Aerospace
Engineering should have its back door in 'scanning' rather than
'tunneling'.


Date Subject Author
5/29/13
Read The Sun Referance
Kevin
5/29/13
Read Re: The Sun Referance
Bacle H

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