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Topic: THE GREAT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY WILL FAN THE FIRE THAT WILL BURN YOUR
MATHEMATICS; THE GAUNTELT AND THE COMPLETE PRIME CALCULUS IS AT PRINCETON

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HOPEINCHRIST

Posts: 335
From: USA
Registered: 2/7/11
THE GREAT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY WILL FAN THE FIRE THAT WILL BURN YOUR
MATHEMATICS; THE GAUNTELT AND THE COMPLETE PRIME CALCULUS IS AT PRINCETON

Posted: Jun 30, 2013 5:45 PM
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I have given the manuscript and the coordinates calculus as to how to derive these values to Princeton university , actually the whole spirals of Prime numbers are smooth , and all those BUM Mathematicians in history who said that the prime numbers are random , will hang from the Gates of Princeton and the International Journal of applied Mathematics research, as effigies. Here is the continuous coordinates for prime number spirals. The rotation is 1:3 2:3( in this spiral +-1/3 and +-2/3)

SPIRAL (14) : 23,37,67,233,277,1283,1297

23:23.66666666666
37:36.33333333333
67:66.33333333333
233:233.666666666
277:276.333333333
1283:1283.666666666
1297:1296.333333333

SPIRAL (16):19,41,43,73,229,1093,1429

19:20.3333333333
41:39.6666666666
43:44.3333333333
73:74.3333333333
229:230.33333333
1093:1094.333333333
1429:1430.333333333

MY Name is Vinoo Cameron , a servant of my Lord Jesus Christ who game me all I needed to destry your mathematuics of Zeus that you worship, I set this fire as I was saying about 19 1:3, ACTUALLY this Prime number mathematics is a direct derivative of the Pythagoras 1:3





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