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Topic: Chapt32 Bell Inequality explained; Atom Totalities 2
nd experimentum- 
crucis #1656 Atom Totality 5th ed

Replies: 7   Last Post: Aug 6, 2013 5:30 PM

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JT

Posts: 1,042
Registered: 4/7/12
Re: Chapt32 Bell Inequality explained; Atom Totaliti
es 2nd experimentum- 
crucis #1657 Atom Totality 5th ed

Posted: Aug 5, 2013 8:12 AM
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Den måndagen den 5:e augusti 2013 kl. 06:02:49 UTC+2 skrev Archimedes Plutonium:
> Now what I want to point out is that in the Aspect Experiment that proves Nature goes the way of Quantum Mechanics in the Bell Inequality and not the way of Einstein and his General Relativity, is that in the Aspect Experiment, it is hypothesized, a hypothetical of what if two connected light beams traveling to opposite ends of the Cosmos, and one is altered and yet the other beam is automatically altered even though it requires a speed of greater than light speed to make that change.
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> What I want to emphasize, is that in the New Physics, these so called superluminal speeds are happening every second and very many times in the world at large. So that in New Physics, superluminal speeds in the Bell Inequality are frequent, and not just a hypothesis in a experiment. But they are not superluminal speeds but rather, the time involved in dy/dt, the time of dt is relativistic. So that a light beam going from Sun to Sloan galaxies at the speed of light reaches the end of the Cosmos in the same time that it reaches from Sun to Earth of some 8 minutes.
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> When you have Relativistic Time, you can have a light beam go from Sun to Earth and reach the destination in 8 minutes and the same light beam go from Sun to Sloan galaxies and be there in 8 minutes, even though it is millions of light years away.
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> This solves the Bell Inequality with Aspect Experiment. We have the speed of light as maximum speed, nothing can go faster, but why want anything to go faster, because light can be at the end of the Cosmos at the same time it takes for light to go from Sun to Earth.
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> This is the resolution needed to understand how the maximum Cosmic speed can be so slow of a speed in a Cosmos of huge distances apart. It can be so slow because the Time factor is relativistic. Time in physics is the counting of points of space traversed. Points of Space in New Physics are magnetic monopoles, and so if we go from Sun to Sloan and only traverse two points of space, we can be there at the Sloan galaxies with a speed of 3*10^5 km/sec yet only take 8 minutes to arrive.
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> AP


Well if speed is d/t=v, it seem like the meters to the Sloan galaxy is longer then the meters from sun to earth. Here we should also distinguish local time, between universal time. Did it take 8 minutes in the frame of the two stationary points eart and Sloan galaxy or did it take 8 minutes in the ship/light frame.

Let me give you an explanation, *someone* let a turd in his mathematic same person have no idea about geometry, same person is not that bright.

Oh the local geometry guy, no no no you stupid fucks the geometry doesn't change, the distance doesn't change, the time rate doesn't change.

The velocity does, and there is a possibility that oscillation time may change for objects travelling a magnetic field.

But the universe remain untouched, that your clock start running out of synch doesn't mean causuality suddenly vanished, it doesn't mean that geometry is broken it is your beleive system craschlanded, your ideas about time, distance, geometry, space that is inherently flawed and broken beyond repair. Start all over build from geometric principles.





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