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Topic: magnets
Replies: 2   Last Post: Aug 9, 2013 11:28 PM

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frank zubek

Posts: 222
Registered: 5/12/09
magnets
Posted: Aug 9, 2013 11:58 AM
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First I tried to have conventional magnets and washers in some other places in my solids, but soon I realized it did not work enough to my satisfaction.

Because the neodymium magnets are ceramic they can be of ANY shape, so I approached my supplier to make me 1/2 discs
so if I can place these 1/2 discs in to a cavity where the surface of this cavity now holds two 1/2 one 1/2 is -N- the other -S- by placing a lid and make the cavity somewhat larger so the magnets can freely rotate in they cavity than by placing a infinite number of polyhedra the magnets will ALWAYS aligned so -N- meets -S-, well my supplier knowing my problem where he seen my cube modules, he said he can make them without cutting them in to 1/2 so he made a disc they called bipolar and this was the solution. There are other ways to solve this problem but I really have to go.
I will get to synergetics later, even though it does not matter to me because I have my tetra. solids and a calculator, that tells me synergetics has wrong orders, relative magnitude of solids, wrong frequencies and have tons of videos showing they errors.
They mathematics is CORRECT they premise is wrong
frank


Date Subject Author
8/9/13
Read magnets
frank zubek
8/9/13
Read Re: magnets
GS Chandy
8/9/13
Read Re: magnets
GS Chandy

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