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Topic: example
Replies: 4   Last Post: Aug 29, 2013 5:39 PM

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frank zubek

Posts: 222
Registered: 5/12/09
Re: example
Posted: Aug 28, 2013 4:59 PM
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So here we are you needed a example where, how, why, my blocks are unique, you have responded to all the little nuances of people can not understand me yet I'm sure you have understand all the cases of uniqueness that is lacking with in the concentric hier., yet you have not made ANY comments, let's see, let me guess,
you knew all the unique aspects of my description correct?

You were aware of it, the minimal, the self building of my polyhedra to they larger self, the lowest common denominators for all structures build, all the surface to vol. ratios of all the mentioned building blocks, the space filling properties of all tetrahedrons in existance,the infinite way to dissect any polyhedrons, I'm just revising, just from my memory, so not remember all the points I have brought up but brought up several key points that make my blocks UNIQUE, yet, I have not heard of any comment from you, I guess it was just to obvious to you, you knew all those mentioned aspects, CORRECT? ?
It is exactly here where I and Bucky differ, hope you keEp it in mind, you were NEVER even considering any such
aspects, to EVEN EXIST.
fz


Date Subject Author
8/24/13
Read example
frank zubek
8/24/13
Read Re: example
kirby urner
8/28/13
Read Re: example
frank zubek
8/29/13
Read Re: example
kirby urner
8/28/13
Read Re: example
GS Chandy

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