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Topic: The integration test suites for Sage.
Replies: 14   Last Post: Sep 14, 2013 1:53 PM

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Peter Luschny

Posts: 20
Registered: 11/18/06
Re: The integration test suites for Sage.
Posted: Sep 12, 2013 4:31 PM
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I now have benchmarked SymPy 0.7.3, which was released
on July 13, 2013. See the release notes [1].
An implementation for SymPy can be found at github [2].
The results are listed at [3].

[1] https://github.com/sympy/sympy/wiki/Release-Notes-for-0.7.3
[2] https://github.com/PeterLuschny/CharlwoodTest
[3] http://luschny.de/math/quad/IntegralTestsSympy.html

>> tan(x)/sqrt((tan(x))^4+1) = sin(2*x)/sqrt(cos(4*x)+3) on the real axis?

> Looks alright to me on the real axis. Is this what Sage/Maxima 5.11
> returns for Charlwood's problem 43?


No. This is just what I observed. I think it is a nice illustration
of what is equal and what not in this context (real line/complex).

> In order to compare systems whose default domain can be either the
> real numbers or the complex numbers, Albert needs model antiderivatives
> that hold on the entire complex plane, but for the former systems he
> accepts as valid any evaluation that holds on the real axis. In the
> Timofeev suite I took care to supply complex model antiderivatives for
> the same reason. On the other hand, I expect real-only answers to be
> fully adequate in professor Charlwood's calculus teaching context.


Ah ok, thanks for the clarification.

> PS: How about contributing a chapter of the Timofeev suite yourself?

Hm, my Russian is a little bit rosty, Genosse Martin!

Peter



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