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Topic: Entanglement causes causality?
Replies: 2   Last Post: Sep 9, 2013 10:40 PM

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Registered: 1/29/11
Entanglement causes causality?
Posted: Sep 7, 2013 4:22 PM
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I'm working on a digital version of a quantum computer
but notice a strange result.

A quantum computers we build today is similar to analogue computer
of yesterday and so a digital quantum computer is a digital version
of an analogue quantum computer but much more precise and versatile.

But there is a problem when implementing its logic that I
notice that someone needs to sort out.

Digital qbits can be produced that are entangled
much like photons that can be produced that are entangled.

"With entangled photons, when one photon is known to be polarized in the up
position the other must be in the down position."

That sounds so simple but it hides an extremely deep problem in causality.

Once a photon orientation of one photon of an entangled pair
is known, in order to guarantee
that the other photon takes the opposite value,
all quantum transitions in the entire universe must follow
in a precise order to ensure that the second photon state
is the oppposite value. If a single quantum state transition
took place that was out of place, anywhere in the universe, you could
end up with that entangled photon being detected as the wrong value
due to the butterfly effect.

So engtanglement guarantees causality.

But then causality can only be realized if all quantum state transitions
are realized in their precise order all at once for each step of time
defined by whatever is the smallest time scale for the smallest state
transition.

So when Einstein said god does not play dice, he was indeed correct.
The entire universe is a mechanism that ticks all at once
to prevent causality violations because of quantum entanglements.
What we see as fuzzy objects
are precisely to do with the tools that are being used.
Just like out of focus lenses. To get sharper pictures you would
need different glasses.


What promted all this is that digital quantum computer must
be manufactured with all its state transitions taking place
all at once to prevent causality errors in entangled bits.
There is no escape.

This implies the real world must also be implemented the same way
unless someone can find a get out clause as to why entanglements
do not cause causality.




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