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Topic: Rubi 4.2 is now available
Replies: 2   Last Post: Sep 19, 2013 10:22 PM

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Albert D. Rich

Posts: 221
From: Hawaii Island
Registered: 5/30/09
Rubi 4.2 is now available
Posted: Sep 15, 2013 2:15 AM
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Version 4.2 of Rubi is now available for downloading at http://www.apmaths.uwo.ca/~arich/. This version incorporates numerous enhancements including new rules for integrating expressions involving trig and inverse trig functions, as well as their hyperbolic function counterparts. For instance, Rubi 4.2 can integrate Charlwood problem #41, as well as the much more difficult

Cos[x]^4/(Sin[x]^3*(a+a*Sin[x])^(3/2))

These and other integration problems are discussed in the sci.math.symbolic thread ?Charlwood Fifty test results?.

Access to Mathematica 7 or better is required to run Rubi 4.2. However, all the over 5,400 rules, expressed in standard mathematical notation, are available for viewing on the website. The rules are organized in a hierarchical structure, making it easy for a human or computer to find the appropriate rule to apply to a given integrand. Thus you can use Rubi like a comprehensive table of integrals to manually integrate expressions. It?s great for calculus homework since you can show the steps required to integrate expressions.

Also available for downloading is an integration test-suite consisting of over 46,000 integrands along with their optimal antiderivatives. The expressions are in machine-readable form and available in Axiom, Maple, Mathematica and Maxima syntax.

Albert D. Rich




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