Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Software » comp.soft-sys.math.mathematica

Topic: Create a Nasty Password with MATHEMATICA
Replies: 1   Last Post: Sep 28, 2013 9:23 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View  
Murray Eisenberg

Posts: 2,105
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Create a Nasty Password with MATHEMATICA
Posted: Sep 28, 2013 9:23 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

Re 2: At least for U.S. sites, there are restrictions such as "letters and numbers only, with at least one number", "letters and numbers only with at least one letter, at least one number, and at least one upper-case letter", etc. And widely varying ranges of the number of characters, typically in the range 8 to 24.

On Sep 27, 2013, at 2:30 AM, Matthias Bode <lvsaba@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
> Hola:
>
> SeedRandom["wrAslb4&IXc#K"]
> RandomInteger[{1, 256}, 25]
> FromCharacterCode[%]
>
> works but I cannot reproduce the result using Alt plus the ASCII number given by RandomInteger[{1, 256}, 25] on my new TOSHIBA Satellite machine; original factory settings for the U.S. and QWERTY keybord.
>
> 1. Is there a way to establish complete coincidence of the two partly distinct interpretations of the ASCII numbers?
>
> 2. Will such an outlandish password be generally understood or are there common character usage restrictions which make my exercise useless?
>
> Best regards,
>
> MATTHIAS BODE
> S 17.36398=B0, W 66.21816=B0,2'590 m. AMSL.
> LVSABA@HOTMAIL.COM
>


---
Murray Eisenberg
murray@math.umass.edu
Mathematics & Statistics Dept.
Lederle Graduate Research Tower
University of Massachusetts
710 North Pleasant Street
Amherst, MA 01003-9305









Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.