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Topic: II, Why I Cannot Support the Common Core
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Jerry P. Becker

Posts: 13,809
Registered: 12/3/04
II, Why I Cannot Support the Common Core
Posted: Oct 13, 2013 4:15 PM
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**********************************
From @ THE CHALK FACE, Saturday, September 7, 2013. See
http://atthechalkface.com/2013/09/07/a-sane-reply-to-bill-mccallum-why-i-cannot-support-the-common-core-state-standards/
**********************************
A Sane Reply To Bill McCallum: Why I Cannot Support the Common Core
"State" Standards

By Michael Paul Goldenberg



William McCallum is, by his own description, a man who was "born in
Australia and came to the United States to pursue a Ph. D. in
mathematics at Harvard University, a professor at the University of
Arizona, working in number theory and mathematics education." He is
also the chair of the Common Core mathematics standards writing
committee.

I know that he has been blogging about CCSSI for quite some time and
is very, very protective of its reputation and the efforts he and his
committee put into creating something that, clearly, he believes in.
Yesterday, I saw something on his blog from early August with the
intriguing title, "Join with me in support of the Common Core". Here
is what he wrote there [see
http://commoncoretools.me/2013/08/01/join-with-me-in-support-of-the-common-core/
]:

I have tried to stay out of the politics swirling around the
standards and focus this blog on helping people who are trying to
implement them. And, after this post, I will keep it that way here at
Tools for the Common Core.

But I've decided it's time take a stand against the swirling tide of
insanity that threatens our work, so I'm starting a new blog called I
Support the Common Core [see http://isupportthecommoncore.net/ ]. It
will provide resources, links to articles, rebuttals, and discussion
to help those who are fighting the good fight. If you sign up you
will be getting emails and calls for action from me and others. Tools
for the Common Core will remain available for those of you who prefer
a quieter life and just want to get on with your jobs.

The success of this effort depends on you. If only 10 brave souls
sign up I will thank them and close down the effort. If 1,000 of you
join then we can get something done (and I promise there will be
jokes).

I attempted to reply, but comments had been closed, with only one
person actually leaving any response at all (brief and positive).
I've not yet gone to the site Bill links to, because I was busy
crafting the following reply, which I discovered couldn't be posted
there:

Be fair, Bill. To say or imply that all critics of CCSSI are insane
or immersed in "insanity" is to refuse to recognize reality. I
understand you're protective of your work, but the objections are not
all a product of either right-wing paranoia, infused with Tea Party
tin-hat wearing conspiracy theories about Obama, the UN, and the
black helicopters. Some of us are quite progressive, quite in favor
of improving the overall quality of mathematics education, and not
worried about the New World Order according to Glenn Beck or Rush
Limbaugh.

But a national initiative driven by billionaires, privatizers, and
corporations is not the way to go, Bill. Your math standards have
flaws, they seem to have often or entirely ignored the work of
developmental psychologist and the input of early elementary
teachers. Topics seem to have been moved (mostly to lower and lower
grades) without clear-cut evidence that students will be ready to
handle them. I see nothing that accounts for students who will lose
key content because it was pushed to the grade(s) they have already
completed: http://bit.ly/17n2e0u

These are not trivial issues. And that's not a complete list. But my
deepest concerns have little to do with any given content standard.
They have to do with those who have funded this project from its
inception, paid for the tests, the rollout, the propaganda machine
that is now in full-throated, panic-fueled mode (your post here seems
like a tiny but definite part of the attempt to deny that there's any
reason to worry), and their motives. On my view, from Day One, this
has been a billionaire/corporate attempt to take over public
education, pure and simple. Of course, there are all sorts of
"reasons" given that don't have to do with the real motive ($$): we
have heard for 30+ years about how our nation is "at risk," oddly all
due to our allegedly failing schools, lazy teachers, poor standards,
lazy students (that one's been around since at least the days of
Horace Mann), and eventually the "real" straw villains: those greedy
teachers' unions! Since Ronald Reagan busted the air traffic
controllers union (who supported him in the 1980 election, by the
way), it's been clear that there is a powerful movement in this
country on the part of the rich and powerful to turn back the clock
to the days before the labor movement had helped workers gain decent
wages and working conditions, something that eventually spilled over
into public service jobs like teaching.

What you have chosen to participate in, knowingly or not, is a major
piece of that retrogressive effort to put maximum power and profit
back in the hands of the plutocrats or 1% as they have come to be
known in the last couple of years. They own the book publishing, the
testing companies, the professional development groups, the charter
schools, and they will not stop until this machine they've built has
destroyed all our public schools by labeling them as "failures" and
shutting them down, to be replaced by for-profit charters and/or
vouchers students can use to pay for whatever private education is
open to them (and it will NOT be any more fair or equitable under
that system for poor kids than it is now, and often it will be far
worse). Having worked with a number of for-profit managed charter
schools, I see all too clearly what the future holds for poor kids
and kids of color. I've written about the phoniness of "choice" that
is being dangled like it means something: http://bit.ly/17n2e0u and I
claim that it is a demonstrable scam of the worst sort.

So no, I won't join you, Bill, because to do so would be unethical
and, flatly, wrong. I hope you come to realize some day how you've
been played by those in power and decide to join those of us who are
not lunatics, not insane, but intelligent people fighting for one of
America's most vital democratic institutions. We are trying to make
positive changes that respect teachers as professionals, parents as
stakeholders, and children as deserving more opportunities, more
freedom, more respect, and more love, wisdom, and kindness than this
twisted juggernaut of high-stakes testing, arbitrary, rigid
"standards," and obscene worship of "rigor" (and money) will ever
understand or grant.

********************************************************
--
Jerry P. Becker
Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction
Southern Illinois University
625 Wham Drive
Mail Code 4610
Carbondale, IL 62901-4610
Phone: (618) 453-4241 [O]
(618) 457-8903 [H]
Fax: (618) 453-4244
E-mail: jbecker@siu.edu



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