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Topic: (infinity) A real story
Replies: 9   Last Post: Oct 17, 2013 6:56 AM

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LudovicoVan

Posts: 3,201
From: London
Registered: 2/8/08
Re: (infinity) A real story
Posted: Oct 17, 2013 6:56 AM
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"Albrecht" <albstorz@gmx.de> wrote in message
news:e00e1061-b497-40d1-a3e3-0aed7b8b805e@googlegroups.com...
> On Thursday, October 17, 2013 3:06:55 AM UTC+2, Julio Di Egidio wrote:
>> "fom" <fomJUNK@nyms.net> wrote in message
<snip>
>> > You are correct concerning the necessity of infinity.
>>
>> But, is he? "Actual infinity" is logically necessary, Zeno docet. And
>> quite reasonable too, just levels of abstraction.

>
> Oh, you are also live in the dream that Cantor has anything to do with
> Zeno's paradoxa? Okay. Give me an idea in which way "actual infinity"
> changes anything in that concern.


It's you who are still making confusion, infinite sets as only completed
sets is one thing, the uncountability of the reals is another, and completed
sets is not in fact Cantor's setting, despite overloads on terminology:
Cantor didn't use an extended set of naturals as the domain of his
functions. Then, whether extended sets (and non-well-founded ordinals? Oh
how I wish people would also concentrate sometimes on *matters of fact*, the
ones that count), change anything to the validity of Cantor's arguments is
just beside the present point, although I would guess it does not, really,
not just by itself.

Julio





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