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Topic: 0^0 in the schoolroom
Replies: 13   Last Post: Nov 5, 2013 10:27 PM

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Peter Percival

Posts: 1,298
Registered: 10/25/10
0^0 in the schoolroom
Posted: Oct 19, 2013 10:57 AM
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I am trying to remember what I was taught about x^y. I do know that, at
university,

x^y =df e^{y log x}

for real or complex numbers (log being defined in terms of an integral,
and exp as its inverse), and

x^0 =df 1, x^{y+1} =df x x^y

for natural numbers.

What I can't recall is what I was taught about

0^0

at school. Three possibilities come to mind:
i) It was undefined. (more precisely: "I [the teacher] choose not to
define it here and now.")
ii) It was never mentioned. (And if a pupil asks?)
iii) 0^0 = 1. (With or without justification.)

How do schools deal with it now? The answer might be different in
different parts of the globe...

--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Lincoln at Gettysburg



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