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Topic: RELATIVITY : SCIENCE WITHOUT RATIONAL THINKING
Replies: 4   Last Post: Nov 19, 2013 12:27 PM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,415
Registered: 12/13/04
RELATIVITY : SCIENCE WITHOUT RATIONAL THINKING
Posted: Nov 17, 2013 3:14 AM
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http://www.aip.org/history/einstein/essay-einstein-relativity.htm
John Stachel: "How can it happen that the speed of light relative to an observer cannot be increased or decreased if that observer moves towards or away from a light beam? Einstein states that he wrestled with this problem over a lengthy period of time, to the point of despair."

Rational thinking says it can't happen - when you start moving away from the light source and, as a result, the wavecrests start hitting you less frequently, this decrease in frequency can only be due to a decrease in the speed of the wavecrests relative to you. Yet Einstein was not a rational thinker - "I never made one of my discoveries through the process of rational thinking":

http://gnosticwarrior.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/alberteinstein.jpg

Nowadays Einsteiniana's teachers brainwash future Einsteinians into seeing a breathtaking picture: As the observer starts moving away from the light source, the frequency he measures decreases but the speed of the wavecrests relative to him remains unchanged, Divine Einstein, yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=EVzUyE2oD1w
Dr Ricardo Eusebi: "Light frequency is relative to the observer. The velocity is not though. The velocity is the same in all the reference frames."

Pentcho Valev



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