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Topic: Formal proof of the ambiguity of 0^0
Replies: 6   Last Post: Nov 17, 2013 2:04 PM

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Dan Christensen

Posts: 2,247
Registered: 7/9/08
Re: Formal proof of the ambiguity of 0^0
Posted: Nov 17, 2013 1:38 PM
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On Sunday, November 17, 2013 12:14:04 PM UTC-5, Julio Di Egidio wrote:
> "Dan Christensen" <Dan_Christensen@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
>
> news:05b0baba-558f-4c19-80f2-f627dbd1b441@googlegroups.com...
>

> > On Sunday, November 17, 2013 10:19:33 AM UTC-5, Julio Di Egidio wrote:
>
> <snip>
>

> >> We were simply explained that 0^0 = 0/0, because x^0 = x/x when extending
>
> >> the notion of repeated multiplication to non-positive exponents.
>
> >
>
> > I can see the reasoning behind it, but I don't like the idea setting two
>
> > undefined expressions equal to one another.
>
>
>
> Nobody is setting two undefined expressions *equal* to one another, I was
>
> speaking informally.


OK.

> Regardless, you quote elementary algebra books, so not
>
> addressing objections.
>


I don't need elementary algebra books to justify my position. We were discussing what is taught in high schools. I don't under your other objections. I was not talking about extending any functions.

Dan
Download my DC Proof 2.0 software at http://www.dcproof.com
Visit my new math blog at http://www.dcproof.wordpress.com



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