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Topic: For all n>10 remove 1 for every countable zero and factor into
identical and unique primes

Replies: 1   Last Post: Nov 19, 2013 5:10 PM

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m.michael.musatov@gmail.com

Posts: 32
Registered: 10/13/13
For all n>10 remove 1 for every countable zero and factor into
identical and unique primes

Posted: Nov 19, 2013 5:00 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

1) The two identical prime factors are two
2) Each unique prime factor is greater than each identical prime factor
3) Each unique prime factor is greater than the sum of the two identical prime factors
3) Each unique prime factor is greater than the product of the two identical prime factors
4) The product of the two identical prime factors is less than each unique prime factor
5) The product of the two identical prime factors is less than the product of the unique prime factor and 1
6) If there is more than one unique prime factor the product of the two identical factors is less than the product of the unique prime factors.


For instance 31

m3 31-3
28=2*2*7

The two unique prime factors are

m4 127-12
115=5*23

From that point forward the Mersenne primes are from removing 1 for each countable zero and separating the factors into two identical and unique prime factors.


m5 8191-819
7,372=2*2*19*97

m6

131,071-13,107
117,964=2*2*7*11*383

Subtract 1 for each countable zero in the integer and factoring produces two identical and two (or more) unique prime factors.

I am looking for collaboration and support in developing this theory and fleshing it out as I am not in the academic world and really akin to someone writing a paper without a single academic reference. So I appreciate any and all support.

M



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