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Topic: 2D->3D vs 3D->4D
Replies: 12   Last Post: Jan 29, 2014 8:14 PM

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David Bernier

Posts: 3,219
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: 2D->3D vs 3D->4D
Posted: Jan 25, 2014 6:05 PM
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On 01/25/2014 04:14 PM, Phil wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I was playing a video game (Skyrim) which involves traveling through
> tunnels and dungeons. Some are complicated -- the tunnels go up, down,
> circle around and go under themselves.
>
> So I felt sorry for Flatlanders. They can get the side-to-side and the
> near-and-far, but they can't comprehend up or down. A very limiting
> experience.
>
> So then I wondered if 4D-people feel sorry for us. But they probably
> shouldn't. It just seems that the shift from 3D to 4D is not that
> overwhelming, whereas going from 2D to 3D is. (e.g. there is nothing
> like the 4-color map theorem in 3D).
>
> I'm not sure if this sort of thing has been quantified (other than the
> obvious, that 2->3 is a 50% increase whereas 3->4 is a 33% increase).
>



I seem to remember that for a 4D world, with gravity falling-off
under a inverse-cube law, instead of inverse-square, but
keeping F = ma, the non-circular orbits of a test-mass around
the "sun" would be very different from ellipses/conic in character.

For example, they might be non-periodic; I forget the details.

dave


--
http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/last_circle/1.htm



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