Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math.independent

Topic: � 432 The complete list is not a square
Replies: 19   Last Post: Feb 23, 2014 2:38 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de

Posts: 13,447
Registered: 1/29/05
Re: § 432 The complete list is not a square
Posted: Feb 21, 2014 6:14 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

On Thursday, 20 February 2014 23:01:01 UTC+1, fom wrote:
> On 2/20/2014 3:51 PM, Virgil wrote:
>

> > In article <ed9f520e-b67a-44a2-a14e-751dd49bd8e5@googlegroups.com>,
>
> > mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de wrote:
>
> >
>
> >>> They are Not Countable within the Theory, and that's what matters!
>
> >>
>
> >> They are countable in mathematics based upon English. And that's what matters
>
> >> for sober minds.
>
> >
>
> > WM may be able to speak authoritatively re what can be said in German,
>
> > but is clearly no authority on either English or mathematics.
>
> >
>
>
>
> He does good enough.
>
>
>
> But, he fails to understand that natural languages
>
> do not allow one to clearly distinguish between
>
> paradoxical self-reference and non-paradoxical
>
> self-reference.


They can distinguish better than formal languages. Remember, all that is said in sci.math is contained in one finite word of the list of all finite words. And all that ever has been said in formal language is also contained in one finite word. Formal language can not even define definition, but it needs definitions. Therefore formalism is a big fraund.

But there is one advantage: it helps its disciples to feel superior and in possesion of absolute truth (also truth cannot be defined).

Regards, WM



Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.