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Topic: Re: How science shaped modern 'rejection of religion'
Replies: 1   Last Post: Apr 16, 2014 8:10 AM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,218
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: How science shaped modern 'rejection of religion'
Posted: Apr 16, 2014 3:12 AM
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Robert Hansen (RH) posted Apr 15, 2014 7:30 PM (http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9435717):
>
> On Apr 15, 2014, at 9:40 AM, GS Chandy
> <gs_chandy@yahoo.com> wrote:
>

> > More lies from Robert Hansen. There are over 140
> > members at my YahooGroup "Towards Democracy" who are
> > most anxiously awaiting the launching of the OPMS
> > website.

>
> Yeah, sure. That is why you have been unable to
> produce even one person able to describe their
> successful experiences with OPMS here. That is the
> record. Straight.
>
> Bob Hansen
>

Check out my post dt. Apr 15, 2014 1:21 PM, http://mathforum.org/kb/thread.jspa?messageID=9435607, to view CONCLUSIVE evidence of the fact that RH lied in respect to his posting on "ISM".

There's plenty of evidence right there about the falsehoods that Robert Hansen makes in his arguments.

Others apart from GSC have observed this propensity of Robert Hansen's of trying to win his arguments via falsehoods.

The above-noted falsehoods about ISM are of course quite apart from Robert Hansen's lies (with Haim, who is alas no longer with us) to the effect that "OPMS is just list-making, and nothing else!".

I don't really believe I owe any explanations to a proven 'retailer of falsehoods'.

HOWEVER:

If you, RH, will tell us WHY you thus lied in the arguments you have been putting up here in the context of OPMS, I shall be happy to provide a list of at least 149 people who have applied OPMS to various issues. You can query them yourself.

I do not claim that all of them have successfully applied OPMS to issues of concern to them - but a good number have indeed done that.

Others are still in the process of learning how to do that effectively - these may be classified as 'ongoing'.

The facilities available at the YahooGroup do not enable 'interactive problem solving', so I haven't been able to help them much (except for providing them the OPMS prototype software = FREELY! - along with some background info about OPMS).

To be truthful, several people have tried out OPMS and OPMS has not worked successfully for them.

In due course, when my OPMS website is up and running, many of those who are now in the 'ongoing' and 'unsuccessful' categories may well be able to transform their applications to 'successful'.

Notes:
=====
1. About OPMS:
The successes that have come up are only on 'individual Missions' and minor organisational Missions. No successes have been recorded on 'societal Missions' - though this is my primary interest.

I claim that even those who have recording such successes are not yet adequately eXpert with OPMS; this is mainly because of the lack of adequate 'interactive facilities' to do do the needed modeling involved, to interpret the models constructed and to proceed further to become expert with OPMS.

2. On 'truthfully arguing issues':
The real issue at hand here is why some people seem to feel impelled to lie in support of their arguments.

I frankly do not understand how it serves any purpose whatsoever.

There is really no need to do this. Such an approach can only be descrivbed as extremely foolish.

That is the record.

Straight.

GSC
("Still Shoveling! Not PUSHING!! Not GOADING!!!")



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