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Topic: Where the lines do cross each other (II)
Replies: 5   Last Post: Apr 29, 2014 6:31 PM

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Luis A. Afonso

Posts: 4,617
From: LIsbon (Portugal)
Registered: 2/16/05
Where the lines do cross each other (II)
Posted: Apr 22, 2014 4:29 PM
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Where the lines do cross each other (II)

At my Aprl 8, 6:53 thread a method was proposed to find out, among two different Distributions, and through a given parameter, the original source. I had shown, that this aim can be just achieved, with 95% Power, by using a crescent sample sizes list, that a singular point, were the H0 0.95 fractile descending Skewness values crosses the 0.05 fractile ascending H1, the common sample size can be promptly elected.
To illustrate an important point where only occasionally the 5% monotonic behavior ends we run a routine regarding the Chi-squared 5 degrees of freedom Skewness:
_____Exp. ___a_________b__________c_____
_____20___ -0.036_______-0.058____-0.102__
_____25___ 0.067______ 0.039_____ 0.016__
_____30___ 0.164______ 0.113_____ 0.172__
_____35___ 0.224______ 0.208_____ 0.189__
_____40___ 0.267______ 0.252_____ 0.275__
_____45___ 0.292______ 0.292_____0.295__
_____50___ 0.349______0.327_____ 0.327__
____ 55___ 0.346 (.369)_0.372_____0.393___
____ 60___ 0.390______0.410_____0.397___
____ 65___ 0.415______0.424_____0.421___
____ 70___ 0.459______0.463_____ 0.441___
____75___ 0.452(.475)_ 0.479_____0.489____
____80___ 0.492______ 0.503_____0.483(.492)
____85___ 0.510______ 0.515_____0.494__
____90___ 0.503(.524)_ 0.525_____0.530__
____95___ 0.537______0.534_____0.538__
___100___ 0.565______0.558_____0.567__

A simple linear interpolation is enough to reestablish the desired decreasing pattern.


Luis A. Afonso



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