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Topic: THE FALSE ABSOLUTE OF RELATIVITY
Replies: 2   Last Post: Apr 25, 2014 2:58 AM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,466
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: THE FALSE ABSOLUTE OF RELATIVITY
Posted: Apr 25, 2014 2:58 AM
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http://physics.bu.edu/~redner/211-sp06/class19/class19_doppler.html
Professor Sidney Redner: "The Doppler effect is the shift in frequency of a wave that occurs when the wave source, or the detector of the wave, is moving. Applications of the Doppler effect range from medical tests using ultrasound to radar detectors and astronomy (with electromagnetic waves). (...) We will focus on sound waves in describing the Doppler effect, but it works for other waves too. (...) Let's say you, the observer, now move toward the source with velocity vO. You encounter more waves per unit time than you did before. Relative to you, the waves travel at a higher speed: v'=v+vO. The frequency of the waves you detect is higher, and is given by: f'=v'/(lambda)=(v+vO)/(lambda)."

The statement:

" Relative to you, the waves travel at a higher speed: v'=v+vO "

is fatal for special relativity. Einsteinians prefer the antithesis:

" Relative to you, the waves travel at the same speed: v'=v "

The problem is that the frequency shift, f'=(v+vO)/(lambda), cannot be derived from the antithesis, v'=v. Clearly the antithesis is false and Redner's statement:

" Relative to you, the waves travel at a higher speed: v'=v+vO "

is true. Special relativity is wrong.

Pentcho Valev



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