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Topic: The brain (and associated mind) is much more mysterious than we
think it is

Replies: 1   Last Post: May 9, 2014 4:22 AM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 6,653
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
The brain (and associated mind) is much more mysterious than we
think it is

Posted: May 7, 2014 4:32 AM
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In support of claim in above title, see "Brain Injury That Turned Jason Padgett Into Math Genius Suggests Dormant Skills May Be Common" http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/06/brain-injury-jason-padgett-math-genius_n_5273609.html.

0. Notwithstanding the superficial nature of the 'HuffPost' article, it does raise various intriguing issues.

1. We know rather little about the brain (and associated mind). I believe Shakespeare might have said it best, when he had Hamlet declaim:

"There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,

Than are dreamt of in your philosophy".

2. A 'mathy person' may well reside in many of us who believe we 'fear or loathe' math: that 'fear and/or loathing' of math may well be an outcome of our incompetent educational systems.

3. Good teachers learn how to excite the curiosity and interest of their students in the beauty and daily utility of math. It's not easy to do in our conventional systems - but it IS possible.

4. Suggestion: We DO know that what teachers (and the educational system in general) need to do is to try and find out how to 'kindle' the inherent 'mathabilities' that probably reside in most of us.

5. To try and ensure my message is not distorted, I want to emphasise that I am NOT claiming that an 'Einstein resides in each of us'!

GSC



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