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Topic: Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's
famous 1927 principle

Replies: 2   Last Post: May 24, 2014 12:03 AM

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Sam Wormley

Posts: 521
Registered: 12/18/09
Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's
famous 1927 principle

Posted: May 21, 2014 10:31 PM
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Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's
famous 1927 principle
> http://phys.org/news/2014-04-uncertainty-rigorous-heisenberg-famous-principle.html

> Nearly 90 years after Werner Heisenberg pioneered his uncertainty
> principle, a group of researchers from three countries has provided
> substantial new insight into this fundamental tenet of quantum
> physics with the first rigorous formulation supporting the
> uncertainty principle as Heisenberg envisioned it.


> In the Journal of Mathematical Physics, the researchers reports a new
> way of defining measurement errors that is applicable in the quantum
> domain and enables a precise characterization of the fundamental
> limits of the information accessible in quantum experiments. Quantum
> mechanics requires that we devise approximate joint measurements
> because the theory itself prohibits simultaneous ideal measurements
> of position and momentum?and this is the content of the uncertainty
> relation proven by the researchers.





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