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Topic: Re: Scientific American - Excerpt from "The Philosophy of
Creativity"

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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,235
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: Scientific American - Excerpt from "The Philosophy of
Creativity"

Posted: May 23, 2014 10:58 PM
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Anna Roys posted May 24, 2014 6:13 AM (http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9470783):
> Use Google Docs?
>

No. Haven't yet been able to do that. (I don't believe it will suffice my needs for an OPMS website - but let me look at it anyway with this in mind).

Thanks,
GSC
>
> On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 6:09 AM, GS Chandy
> <chandy.sag@gmail.com> wrote:
>

> > Further my last (dt. May 23, 2014 11:51 AM,
> >

> http://mathforum.org/kb/thread.jspa?threadID=2633379),
> I observe that I

> > had omitted several points that I should have made
> there. Herewith brief
> > notes, next to the paragraphs where the discussion
> was inadequate in the
> > earlier posting:
> > >
> > <snip>
> > >
> > > [This concept of *intricate involvement* is

> something
> > > that only recently came to mind. I shall try and
> > > make it clearer in what follows, but full clarity
> > > will probably take somewhat longer to appear -

> even
> > > in my own mind! It's a bit different from
> > > *inextricable involvement* (though there surely

> is a
> > > bit of each in the other)].
> > >

> > I've not managed to make clear the distinction I
> am seeing between
> > *intricate involvement* and *inextricable
> involvement*. Probably this can
> > be done only with the aid of some 'prose +
> structural graphics' (p+sg) -
> > this is my feeling anyway.
> >
> > Possibly we'd need some discussion of the

> "IMPLICATIONS" involved in the
> > structure of the 'thought systems' I am attempting
> to explore.
> >
> > Here, I find myself at a bit of a loss because of

> the non-availability of
> > a practical modeling tool for the "IMPLICATIONS"
> relationship in complex
> > systems - something that could do for the
> "IMPLICATIONS" relationship what
> > 'Interpretive Structural Modeling' (ISM) has done
> for the "CONTRIBUTION"
> > and other such '1st order transitive relationships
> in complex systems'.
> >
> > Possibly someone who has profoundly explored and

> thoroughly understood
> > "IMPLICATIONS", like Robert Hansen, may be able to
> come to my aid?
> > >
> > > Anyway, there is clearly considerable

> *creativity* in
> > > 'learning something new' (in math, or in any
> other
> > > discipline); there is also great creativity in
> > > ideating and then developing those new ideas (in
> > > math, or in any other discipline).
> > >

> > I don't know if empirical studies have been done
> relating to these aspects
> > of *creativity* - the creativity involved in
> learning something new,
> > exploring new knowledge. I suspect that any such
> studies performed using
> > the 'conventional systems' of thought are likely to
> be 'inadequate' (to put
> > it mildly).
> > >
> > <snip>
> > >
> > > In his generally sound introductory remarks to

> the
> > > excerpt he's provided to the book "The
> Philosophy of
> > > Creativity", Scott Barry Kaufman makes clear his
> > > appreciation of the importance of the issue for

> us as
> > > humans:
> > >

> > <snip>
> > I've snipped Scott Barry Kaufman's introductory

> remarks that I had
> > quoted, and point out that they provide a useful
> '1st order appreciation of
> > *creativity*: we obviously do need to go somewhat
> deeper, which, in my
> > view, is very difficult - perhaps even impossible -
> to do in the 'pure
> > prose' mode.
> > >
> > <snip>
> > >
> > > However, I suggest another, further, proposition:
> > >
> > > There is considerable *real creativity* involved

> in
> > > the 'learning of math' (at any level) - from the
> > > most elementary to the most advanced. There is

> *real
> > > creativity* (of probably a different order)
> involved
> > > in the *creation* of 'new math'.
> > >
> > > There is both 'knowledge' and 'art' (in Robert
> > > Hansen's sense) *intricately involved* in the
> > > *creation* of 'new math'. In fact, there is, I
> > > claim, both 'knowledge' and 'art' intricately
> > > involved in the *creation* of 'new knowledge' in

> ANY
> > > discipline!
> > >
> > > There are, for instance, VERY advanced levels of

> both
> > > 'knowledge' and 'art' in the creation of one of
> > > George Hart's 'geometrical sculptures'.
> > >

> > I'd like to emphasise all of the above. I'd also
> like to explore all of
> > the above much more deeply, using the many useful
> ideas that have been
> > expressed (via the OPMS). Unfortunately, we lack
> the needed facilities for
> > the interactive exploration of ideas. Maybe when
> such a facility becomes
> > readily available, I shall be able to do some of
> that...
> > <snip>
> >
> > GSC
> >




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