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Topic: grading cc algebra
Replies: 28   Last Post: Jun 4, 2014 9:27 PM

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Meg Clemens

Posts: 312
Registered: 12/3/04
RE: grading cc algebra
Posted: Jun 4, 2014 6:04 AM
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I don't like the scoring of the third sample student response for #28 (page
14 in the sample responses). The student algebraically determined the
vertex of the translated parabola (and wrote out all the steps) but the
scoring didn't count this as 'explain'. So 'explain' means the student
needs to write it out in words, not mathematics?



I'm surprised that this forum doesn't have any comments yet on the questions
themselves. Was I the only teacher surprised by #31? Holy cow, fourth
degree polynomial factoring in Algebra 1.





Meg Clemens

Canton Central



From: owner-nyshsmath@mathforum.org [mailto:owner-nyshsmath@mathforum.org]
On Behalf Of Kathy Noftsier
Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2014 11:03 PM
To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org
Subject: Re: grading cc algebra



If you read the sample responses and not just the rubric it is very possible
with the right justification.

----- Original Message -----

From: StGOLD2112@aol.com

To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org

Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2014 9:22 PM

Subject: Re: grading cc algebra



I would be surprised if 300 was accepted. The question clearly indicates
that x "represents the number of products, in hundreds...," so if x = 300,
the student is suggesting that it would take 300 hundred products to make
the production costs equal, which is not correct. The value of x is 3,
meaning that 300 products would be required.



Steve Goldman

Half Hollow Hills HS East

Dix Hills, NY




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