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Topic: 1.97 - What others say about the New Calculus.
Replies: 13   Last Post: Jul 11, 2014 1:43 AM

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Brian Q. Hutchings

Posts: 6,037
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: 1.97 - What others say about the New Calculus.
Posted: Jul 8, 2014 5:06 PM
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you must be a card carrying member of The venetian partY

> It's very easy to see that Leibniz was not in the same class as Newton. Newton's accomplishment by far surpass anything Leibniz did. However, Leibniz was attempting to produce a rigorous calculus. I suppose Germanic genes haven't changed too much since then. I preferred Leibnizian notation but when I studied Leibniz's formulation, it too was found wanting.
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> Newton seemed to be a bit of a hog when it came to consistency and communicating his thoughts. Leibniz on the other hand was disciplined and tried to be consistent always.
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> It does not matter any longer what Newton or Leibniz thought because the New Calculus (http://thenewcalculus.weebly.com) has been discovered. I recommend only that their works be studied for historical interest. Newton accomplished far more than Leibniz. Of this, there can be no doubt.
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> The difference between Newton and me: The first and only rigorous formulation of calculus in human history.
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> Comments are NOT welcome. This comment is produced in the interests of public education; and to eradicate ignorance and stupidity from mainstream mythmatics.




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