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Topic: Arithmetic compression
Replies: 2   Last Post: Jul 22, 2014 12:08 PM

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Ben Bacarisse

Posts: 1,316
Registered: 7/4/07
Re: Arithmetic compression
Posted: Jul 22, 2014 11:51 AM
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jonas.thornvall@gmail.com writes:

> Den tisdagen den 22:e juli 2014 kl. 16:20:37 UTC+2 skrev Ben Bacarisse:
>> jonas.thornvall@gmail.com writes:
>>

>> > Den tisdagen den 22:e juli 2014 kl. 14:06:40 UTC+2 skrev Ben Bacarisse:
>> >> jonas.thornvall@gmail.com writes:
>> >> <snip>

>> >> > I actually have a arithmetic circuit switch in mind that will save
>> >> > alot of digit compressing binary raw data rather then data types,
>> >> > roughly a third will be compressed.

>> >>
>> >> There are two keys things about any compression scheme: the set of
>> >> inputs that get compressed (and by how much), and the set of inputs that
>> >> expand (and by how much). The most useful schemes have frequently
>> >> occurring data in the first and rare data in the second.
>> >>

>> > It will a binary sequense of any length by a third.
>>
>> What lengths will the sequences "", "0", "1", "00", "01", "10" and "11
>> become?

>
> I do not think anyone but a fool is interested in compressing binary
> digit pairs. Are you a fool?


Yes, I am, but my point still stands. All you need to do is re-phrase
"binary sequence of any length" so that it becomes true for your
proposed algorithm. (I can't help with that because I don't know the
algorithm).

--
Ben.



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