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Topic: A limit at a point means a function is continuous at that point, but
orangutans still don't get it!

Replies: 10   Last Post: Nov 12, 2017 3:09 PM

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genmailus@gmail.com

Posts: 311
Registered: 8/18/16
A limit at a point means a function is continuous at that point, but
orangutans still don't get it!

Posted: Nov 9, 2017 7:49 AM
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There is **no limit** to e^(-1/(x^2)) as x approaches 0.

The idiotic mainstream tendency is to transfer the limit to the exponent, that is,

-oo = Lim_{x \to 0} -1/(x^2)

in which case we say there is no limit because -oo is NOT a limit.

Then what do orangutans do? They say:

0=e^(-oo)

treating infinity exactly as if it were a number. Chuckle. I wonder ... does the limit operator jump back and forth between the exponent and e ....

As I've stated in the past and continue to state, you cannot have a HOLE in a function at a point c in an interval (a,b) if the function is continuous on the interval and has a limit at c. The bogus mainstream calculus NEEDS holes, but even then, it needs a lot more decrees to stay afloat.

Therefore, the function e^(-1/(x^2)) has NO limit at x=0 otherwise it would be continuous at x=0.

And you thought Swiss cheese was holey eh?!

Wolfram computational engine states that the limit is 0. Tsk, tsk. Idiots...

Eat shit and die Mr. Penis Messager (Jean Pierre Messager / alias Python).




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