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Topic: Problem of the Week, February 14-18
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Problem of the Week

Posts: 292
Registered: 12/3/04
Problem of the Week, February 14-18
Posted: Feb 14, 1994 3:55 PM
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The problem of the week is a regular feature here at the geometry forum.
Each weekend a high school level geometry problem will be posted, and the
following weekend a summary of solutions and their authors will be posted.

Please do not post solutions to the problem of the week; instead mail your
answer along with as detailed a description of your method as
necessary/possible to pow@forum.swarthmore.edu (replying to this message
will also work). Solutions should be received by midnight Friday so they
can be combined and posted over the weekend.

Please include your name, grade, and school along with your answer.

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Problem of the Week, February 14-18

When last we left our heroes, Jill and Jimmy, they had figured out that
the bridge over the river would need to be 65 meters long. Here's a
picture (without the bridge, courtesy of Gino Perrotte):
|
|
| 16m
|

__________ _______|
10m ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 7m
46m

Now, people who use the river are starting to ask questions. In
particular, there is a company who floats barges up and down the river.
Their biggest barges are 30 meters in width. How high above the water
could the top of one of their barges be and still fit under the bridge?

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