Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Inactive » Historia-Matematica

Topic: [HM] Philosophy of Real Mathematics
Replies: 2   Last Post: May 8, 2003 9:13 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
David Corfield

Posts: 10
Registered: 12/3/04
[HM] Philosophy of Real Mathematics
Posted: May 6, 2003 4:35 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply


List members may be interested to learn that I have recently published a
book, 'Towards a Philosophy of Real Mathematics', with Cambridge
University Press . The book
is based on my agreement with the second half of Lakatos's assertion in
'Proofs and Refutations' that:

The history of mathematics, lacking the guidance of philosophy, has
become blind, while the philosophy of mathematics, turning its back on
the most intriguing phenomena in the history of mathematics, has become
empty.


1. Introduction: a role for history; Part I. Human and Artificial
Mathematicians: 2. Communicating with automated theorem provers; 3.
Automated conjecture formation; 4. The role of analogy; Part II.
Mathematical Uncertainty: 5. Bayesianism in mathematics; 6. Uncertainty
in mathematics and science; Part III. The Growth of Mathematics: 7.
Lakatos's philosophy of mathematics; 8. The methodology of mathematical
research programmes; 9. The importance of mathematical
conceptualisation; Part IV. The Interpretation of Mathematics: 10.
Higher dimensional algebra.

I'd certainly welcome any exchange on the first half of Lakatos's claim.

David Corfield, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton St., Oxford OX1 4JJ, UK
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~sfop0076/







Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.