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Topic: [HM] False proofs
Replies: 1   Last Post: Apr 22, 2004 4:42 AM

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Michael Lambrou

Posts: 70
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: [HM] False proofs
Posted: Apr 22, 2004 4:42 AM
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>
> Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2004 19:10:32 -0700
> From: "Peter Ross" <PRoss@scu.edu>
> Subject: Re: [HM] False proofs
>



> I didn't see any discussion of the history of the fallacies,
> probably because that would be virtually impossible in most cases.



If one would write a history of fallacies for the benefit of
learners of mathematics, don't forget to mention Euclid's "Pseudaria".
The following is my translation from Greek of the relevant text in
Proclus, "On Euclid":

"Since many ideas are apparently true and following from scientific
principles, but lead away from the principles into error deceiving
the thoughtless (= epipoleos = casual, superficial), he (=Euclid) has
handed methods that enable us to have clear understanding of these
issues,
with the help of which methods we can train the beginners in this theory

(= geometry) so they can identify the fallacies, and remain undeceived.
The treatise into which he incorporated these issues for our preparation
he entitled Pseudaria, classifying in order the various techniques,
training our mind for each case by various types of theorems, setting
side by side the false and true results, and illustrating by practical
means the
refutation of the fraud. This book is then purgative and for
training..."

All the best from rainy Crete, after I forget how many dry weeks.

Michael Lambrou






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