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Topic: Re: Hung with their own petard?
Replies: 5   Last Post: Jun 11, 2004 4:08 PM

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Jerry Uhl

Posts: 339
Registered: 12/6/04
Saxon
Posted: Jun 11, 2004 4:08 PM
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att1.dat (6.9 K)


From: jbecker@siu.edu
Subject: Saxon Textbook Co. sold (to Harcourt)
Date: June 11, 2004 11:46:40 AM CDT
To: jbecker@siu.edu

***********************
From the Oklahoman, June 3, 2004. See
http://www.newsok.com/cgi-bin/show_article?
ID=1255511&pic=none&TP=getbusiness -- you need to register (no cost) to
get access to the article . Our thanks to David Boliver for bringing
this article to our attention.
***********************
Saxon textbook company sold

By Paul Monies

NORMAN - A unit of education giant Harcourt has agreed to buy the
family-owned school textbook company Saxon Publishers Inc., the
companies said Wednesday.

Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. Pending regulatory
approval, the deal is expected to close within the next 30 days.

Norman-based Saxon has been a leader in the math textbook market called
"alternate basal," which combines traditional textbooks with
supplemental materials such as workbooks.

Saxon employs more than 200 people at its Norman headquarters and
distribution facility.

Because the deal is still subject to regulatory approval, it's too
early to discuss the possibility of layoffs or other personnel changes,
said Richard Blake, a spokesman for Harcourt Education. A Saxon
spokeswoman in Norman declined to comment.

College teacher John H. Saxon founded the company in 1981 and pioneered
the Saxon Method for math education, which relies on continual drills
and cumulative testing. He died in 1996.

"Saxon is the undisputed leader in skill-based math instruction," said
Tim McEwen, president of Harcourt Achieve. "It is an incredibly strong
brand, with a large and loyal following that is growing every day."

Saxon's four children - three physicians and a pharmacist - own the
company and serve on its board.

Although Saxon had executive managers for several years, the children
expanded the management team and board of directors after the elder
Saxon died.

"Over the years, we have been approached by many companies interested
in acquiring Saxon," John H. Saxon III said in a statement.

"I am pleased to say we believe Harcourt has the experience, resources
and commitment to further our father's vision and to continue the
success of the company he founded."

Saxon does not release sales figures, but industry estimates put its
annual revenues between $25 million and $75 million. The company said
its books have been used by more than 7 million students in 100
countries.

In recent years, Saxon has branched out from math textbooks to
spelling, early learning and phonics programs.

Blake said Harcourt hopes the Saxon acquisition will allow it to
capitalize on the increased attention to math test scores.

"We see math as an area of growing importance," Blake said.

"A lot of the emphasis in education policy over the last few years has
been on reading. We see more attention now being paid to math, and
that's an area we wanted to be in."

New York-based merchant bank Veronis Suhler Stevenson advised Saxon in
the deal.

Managing Director Robert J. Broadwater said Saxon didn't put itself up
for sale but had received inquiries from several companies.

Harcourt is a division of Reed Elsevier, a Dutch-British publishing
conglomerate that also owns the LexisNexis database system.
****************************************
--
Jerry P. Becker
Curriculum & Instruction
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4610
Phone: (618) 453-4241 [O]
(618) 457-8903 [H]
Fax: (618) 453-4244
E-mail: jbecker@siu.edu

On Mar 6, 2004, at 12:29 AM, Wayne Bishop wrote:

> At 11:55 PM 3/5/2004 -0500, Victor Steinbok wrote:
>

>> This is a simple rule that has been discussed here before and is
>> subject to federal regulations-

>
> Again the Steinbok shuffle... Find me, and share with us all, *any*
> federal regulation that prohibits - or even implies - that
> identification of the school in such studies, the hospital where a
> particular procedure or medication was being tested if it is FDA
> stuff, etc., is prohibited. I will print it out, pour a glass of the
> wine appropriate for a crow meal, and eat it. Until then, I'll just
> enjoy the wine but, admittedly, would be enjoying it more if I thought
> you'd actually pursue the issue this time instead of continuing to try
> to mislead less informed readers.
>

>> I don't blame them for hanging up on you.
>
> They did not. They were entirely civil in their stone-walling as was
> I in asking them to stop stone-walling.
>

>> Old John was clearly off his rocker if he called YOU to do his
>> research.

>
> Not the research; find the schools. I think he believed that I had
> more influence with California schools than I did, do, or ever have
> had.
>

>>> The California schools and districts that enthusiastically adopted
>>> Saxon Math when it became available at state expense in 1999 have
>>> certainly affirmed his confidence.

>>
>> So would the "bandleader" in Godfather.

>
> Speaking of bands, I think Professor Harold Hill's recommendation for
> use of Everyday Math or TERC, followed by Connected Math, with
> secondary IMP or Core Plus for mathematics to complement his band
> activities right here in River City would be a far more accurate
> analogy. This stuff is not known as Music Man Math without cause.
>
> Wayne.
>
>
>

------------------------------------------------------------------
Jerry Uhl juhl@cm.math.uiuc.edu
Professor of Mathematics, Professor of Education
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

http://www-cm.math.uiuc.edu , http://netmath.math.uiuc.edu, and
http://matheverywhere.com

My theory of teaching is that if I do my job right, then my students
will be just fine in life (won't need me as much anymore) ... learning
on their own, acquiring new skills, and prepared for what comes their
way. I could fill minds with facts all day long, but if a mind cannot
think, then what use does it have?

NetMath Master Mentor Michael Raschke




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