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Topic: effective use of time in teaching/learning
Replies: 16   Last Post: Nov 11, 1997 9:07 AM

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Howard L. Hansen

Posts: 48
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: effective use of time in teaching/learning
Posted: Nov 14, 1996 9:37 PM
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Jennifer Kaplan wrote:
>
> Howard Hansen wrote:

> >all of the block scheduling schemes I have seen and including the one I
> >now >teach under, result in a reduction in classroom time--e.g.

>
> Howard,
>
> This statement is false. I teach on a modified block schedule. Each day
> we have three 100 minute classes and one 60 minute class. Courses meet
> every other day. I have crunched the numbers many times and we now have
> more classroom time than we ever did under the traditional 7 period
> schedule.
>
> Jennifer
>


Jeesh Jennifer, I'm glad to now see a different scheme (but you really
don't give much detail--how is lunch handled, was the school day
extended when you went to block, etc.) 100 minutes? I think this much
time in one class creates its own difficulties--what grade level are you
working with? How is retention? How do you handle homework?
Anyway, I don't think, if read carefully, that my original staement can
in any way be claimed false. How could you possibly know which
scheduling schemes I'd seen? Most of the literature on block scheduling
supports the claim that the majority of block scheduling schemes result
in a reduction in total classroom time.

H^2
--
Howard L. Hansen
Southeastern Jr./Sr. High School
Bowen, IL
http://www.ECNet.Net/users/mfhlh/wiu/index.htm
"Good mathematics is not how many answers you know,
but how you behave when you don't know the answer."





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