Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Education » math-teach

Topic: Re: lecturing
Replies: 0  

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List  
SALIJ@aol.com

Posts: 12
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: lecturing
Posted: Jun 30, 1995 10:32 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

<small groups trying to teach themselves seems like an
invitation to b.s. sessions about who is dating who and how many Hideo struck
out last night against the Rockies. At least it would be entertaining!>
If you read the literature on cooperative learning, I believe you would find
that cooperative learning sessions need to be designed so constructive work
takes place. It is not an excuse for teachers not to plan, but rather to
plan better on how to engage the students in their learning. Someone stated
they can tell if the students are "getting it" when they are lecturing. When
I am observing in classes, I frequently sit in the back of the room and I was
amazed at how little many of the students were listening and what other
things they were doing - in fact, I've seen students talking about who is
dating etc. while the teacher was lecturing. Sometimes the conversations are
by note, but sometimes they just chat with one another. I think even more
important that cooperative learning, which I think should be used
judiciously, should be whole group response strategies. Having the students
involved in the lesson is what's important. have them solve a problem as
you're talking. Then have them share their answer with a neighbor and see if
they agree. Have them share their solutions with another pair and voila, you
have a cooperative group. I think you have to have quiet think time -
discussion time with other young mathematicians - time to defend your ideas
and time to hear the pearls of wisdom from the teacher. All these components
are important, but the most important is to have the student connected. Do
they feel they can explain what you are talking about or can they just sit
back and mindlessly copy down your words into their notes. I vote for
involvement.

Iowa tonya






Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.