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Topic: Re: coaching
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Bob Wilson

Posts: 13
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: coaching
Posted: Jul 6, 1995 12:12 AM
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IMHO, as has been used, this attack on coaches is lame. I know many coaches
who are above these tirades, some who are not. What is the point? Actually,
I once coached, and, HEAVEN FORBID, enjoyed it. It may be education at its
purest form; I want to, therefore I will apply myself. Instead of this
pointless attack on coaches, many of whom are fine people even if they are
"HORRORS" not mathematicians (in fact, how many of the "math teachers" out
are truly mathematicians?), what say we talk about something a tad bit more
relevant, at least to me, a lowly 6th grade teacher.

Awhile back, someone, whose question I really respect, wondered how to access
a file of problems to give our students to challege them with real world
situations. That query went basically unanswered. Instead, we have had an
almost unending "lecture" on the importance of LECTURE. On the other side was
the the support of cooperative learning. If both sides of the bench would
COOPERATE, maybe we could see that we agree more than we disagree.

Does anyone out there have suggestions as to www sites, or other relevant to
the classroom info centers, that they would recommend? The
LECTURE/COOP/ANTI-COACH approach is, to me,
pointless/counterpointless/snoooooooooooooore. Go ahead, Dan, make your
day. (I have, believe it or not, agreed with a couple of times lately. But
then, I'm silly.)

Bob, sorry, none of your fancy endings.





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