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Topic: enough lecturing and enough coaching
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jul 9, 1995 3:58 AM

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Annie Fetter

Posts: 524
Registered: 12/3/04
enough lecturing and enough coaching
Posted: Jul 7, 1995 1:16 AM
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Yes, me again. The coaches and lecturing discussions have not gone
anywhere fast (or even slow) in the last couple of days. Yes, we've
collectively agreed that some topics beyond the direct scope of the
Standards are okay, but let's practice some courtesy and common sense.

Let me sum up the discussions. First, coaches. There are a lot of people
who have teaching jobs because they are coaches (and not even very good
ones, at that, at times). They wouldn't know a conjecture if it bit 'em on
the butt. Then there are a lot of people who are brilliant teachers AND
coaches. (The kids on my college teams get on my case for using words like
perpendicular, parallel, orthogonal, and tangent when describing to them
what they ought to be doing and where they should be on the field.) But
let's end that discussion (unless someone really has something new and
insightful to say about coaches, the math classroom, and the Standards).

As for lecturing, sometimes it's appropriate, sometimes it's not, some
people like it, and some people don't. This discussion hasn't moved in a
week. Let's try some new topics.

One can make the argument that "if you don't want to read it, delete it".
Well, what with the traffic recently, I can't really read anything because
I don't have time to weed out any potentially interesting topics from the
repetition. There have been a number of new topics introduced that haven't
elicited the responses they might were they not surrounded.

Traffic on this group is quite high (lots of teachers with lots of free
time now that school is over?). It is difficult to learn how to
communicate on the Internet. You must try to make your point thoroughly
the first or maybe the second time. It's not like debating someone in
public. There are people who are posting pretty much the same thing on the
same topic many, many times. This belabors the point, and doesn't win you
any converts. Say what you have to say, and try to say it well, and sit on
your hands when someone disagrees with you unless you really have something
new to say. Hopefully we'll all get better at communicating in this new
manner, but we cannot treat it _exactly_ like a conversation. It's
certainly too much for me to keep up with.

No, I'm not an Internet goddess, but I have been participating in online
discussions for seven years. There have been many times when I read
responses and followups to one of my posts and thought "But! Wait!" but
didn't post unless there were questions or if my ideas had been grossly
misunderstood. There is a definite art to explaining yourself or your
question to faceless listeners and then _just listening_, and I think we
would benefit if a lot of us tried to do just that.

And one more thing: Change the subject line when you change the subject!

-Annie







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