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Topic: Re: meaningful standards (fwd)
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DoctorCHEK@aol.com

Posts: 67
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: meaningful standards (fwd)
Posted: May 31, 1995 8:39 PM
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Steve Means wrote:

----snip-------------------- there was a rather long silence.
Finally, she asked, "Why am I computing these ratios anyway?" I burst out
laughing! What a great question! There was absolutely no reason to do any
of those problems, other than to drill the definition which was placed up
front! WHO CARES INDEED! It was useless!


This girl could only have come from a Trig course on Mars. For a teacher to
simply define tangent or sine, and then have an advanced math student just go
home and do a bunch of division problems... is not teaching. In my 23 years
of teaching, I have never seen this type of an assignment given to a student
taking trigonometry. I wonder if it is possible that this girl said, "why am
I computing these ratios anyway?" because she wasn't paying attention in
class when the teacher explained the concept. Perhaps she missed the correct
directions for the assignment. Quite often kids (especially high school
kids) will say something to their parents or freinds that DO NOT accurately
describe what the teacher explained or described in class. Dan Hart makes a
good point when he says student learning is directly related to student
studying and motivation. I really feel that this young lady did not pay
attention in class on this given day.

Just my guess....Harv Becker





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