Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Education » math-teach

Topic: equidiversiPC
Replies: 0  

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List  
Michael South

Posts: 16
Registered: 12/6/04
equidiversiPC
Posted: Jun 5, 1995 6:05 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

msouth/equity--diversity/1

I think Dax Mitchell's example is a good approach to the whole diversity/
political correctness thing. There was no compromise of content, just an
example of something a current mathematician did. The fact that it made
a difference to one student is evidence that providing like-gendered or
like-colored or whatever role models can be valuable.

If Dax had chosen this example over another better or more relevant
example simply because this person was female, there would be some
question as to whether the choice was ethical. Given that males
probably have plenty of role models available, I could see someone
choosing a female example over male even if there was a minor
compromise of relevance, but its definitely a judgement call that
would have to be carefully considered.

I've seen plenty of textbooks which (if the pictures are any indication)
appear to come from a world in which almost every scientist and
science student is female or a member of some minority. As long as
the textbook doesn't compromise content, I don't see this as a problem,
although I must confess that I'll be guilty of a politically incorrect
chuckle as I leaf through it. The important thing in any "righting past
wrongs" movement is to find a balance instead of rabid reactionism.
Being "unfair in the other direction" is only going to cause more
problems later, even though it seems like it might get more done now.

mike





Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.